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Doing Goethean Science

For the past two days, students of the 2015/2016 Masters in Holistic Science course at Schumacher College have been studying phenomenology, particularly as understood and developed by German polymath, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, for the purposes of scientific inquiry. Our study has been supported by an introduction to praxis—each student has been tasked with an apprenticeship to the secret life of a particular plant.

We have been aided in this vast effort by Nature Institute director Craig Holdrege, a veritable expert of Goethean science and a Steiner educator with over two decades of experience, who has been

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All Roads Lead To Schumacher — Update 2

All Roads Lead To Schumacher — Update 2

My fists are clenched. I unclench them. My legs are crooked; I straighten them. I sit up a bit straighter in my green chair, and lightly tap my fingers along the wide wooden desk.


Briefly, I glance out the window at the oak leaves fluttering just outside. A pair of simple white earbuds are in each ear, and I’m listening to the newest collaboration between Ólafur Arnalds and Nils Frahm, two of my favourite musicians. Classical music. Kindof.

What an incredible week it has been. I arrived at Schumacher six days ago, on Saturday, nearly down to the

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All Roads Lead To Schumacher — Update 1.5

Thank you, thank you, thank you. Your love, your prayers, your donations, are helping me reach a place that will transform me—help me become of service to the brilliant future we seek to create; in the words of Charles Eisenstein, "the more beautiful world our hearts know is possible".

But we're not there yet. Full update coming soon. I know, it's a bit of a mystery. I'll be revealing everything in the next day or so.


"An eye is meant to see things.
The soul is here for its own joy.
A head has one use:

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All Roads Lead to Schumacher

All Roads Lead to Schumacher

On the afternoon of December 21st, 2006, I was cut down by a tree .

Spines of hoarfrost glimmered in the pale light, and despite my fleece-lined GoreTex, I was shivering. This part of western Canada was considered a temperate rainforest; it didn’t usually get this cold. I had turned seventeen in April, and like most teens, I was confused, lonely, and had a poor relationship with the future.

But more than anything, I was afraid. Mostly of my own faults and lack of experience, but further terrified of my ambitions. I wanted to become a writer, an educator,

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